Dachshund Boston Terrier Mix: Bo-Dach Breed Overview

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The world of hybrid dog breeds is fascinating, with each mix offering a unique combination of traits from its parent breeds.

One Boston Terrier mix that has become popular is the Bo-Dach.

The Bo-Dach, also known as the Boston Weenie, is a small to medium-sized dog breed that embodies the best physical attributes of its parent breeds, Boston Terrier and Dachshund. With a friendly demeanor, playful energy, and distinctive appearance, Bo-Dachs have found a special place in the hearts of many pet owners and families.

In the article, we will explore the Boston Terrier Dachshund mix breed to help you determine if the Bo-Dach is the the right dog for you.

We have included pictures throughout the article to give you an idea of what the Bo-Dach looks like.

Dachshund Boston Terrier Mix Breed Dog. The Bo-Dach is a small to medium-sized dog breed that embodies the best physical attributes of its parent breeds, Boston Terrier and Dachshund. With a friendly demeanor, playful energy, and distinctive appearance, Bo-Dachs have found a special place in the hearts of many pet owners and families.
Bo-Dach photo courtesy of @jtsikora on Instagram
  1. Origin and History
  2. Size and Appearance
  3. Personality and Temperament
  4. Health and Lifespan
  5. Exercise Needs
  6. Grooming Needs
  7. Suitability as Family Pets
  8. Is the Bo-Dach Right for You?

Origin and History

Before we delve into the Bo-Dach breed, it’s essential to understand its roots and why this breed was created. This exploration takes us back to the origins of its parent breeds, the Boston Terrier and the Dachshund.

Boston Terrier

The Boston Terrier, as its name suggests, was first bred in Boston, Massachusetts in the late 19th century. Created from a mix of the English Bulldog and the now extinct English White Terrier, the intention was to combine the Bulldog’s tenacity and athleticism with the Terrier’s agility and intelligence.

While originally used as pit-fighting dogs, it quickly became clear that they were not cut out to be fighters.

The Boston Terrier, as its name suggests, was first bred in Boston, Massachusetts in the late 19th century. Created from a mix of the English Bulldog and the now extinct English White Terrier, the intention was to combine the Bulldog's tenacity and athleticism with the Terrier's agility and intelligence.
Boston Terrier

Boston Terriers are small to medium-sized dogs boasting well-muscled bodies and a short, sleek coat. Their coat can be found in various colors such as brindle, seal, and black, usually accompanied by white markings.

The breed is known for its square-shaped head, short muzzle, large, expressive eyes, and friendly, lively temperament, making them excellent family pets.

Dachshund

Originating in Germany and literally translating to ‘Badger dog’, the Dachshund’s roots go back to the 15th century. The breed was originally developed to hunt badgers, thanks to their short, low-slung, cylindrical bodies that allowed them to navigate tunnels and burrows efficiently.

Often referred to as Doxie, Weiner, or sausage dogs, their elongated bodies and short legs bear a resemblance to hot dogs.

Originating in Germany and literally translating to 'Badger dog', the Dachshund's roots go back to the 15th century. The breed was originally developed to hunt badgers, thanks to their short, low-slung, cylindrical bodies that allowed them to navigate tunnels and burrows efficiently.
Dachshund

Over time, German breeders honed the Dachshund’s characteristics, selectively breeding dogs with desired physical traits and hunting abilities. Emphasis was placed on creating a breed that was tenacious, courageous, and possessed a keen sense of smell.

Today, while the Dachshund’s hunting instincts are still appreciated, they are more commonly found as companion dogs, their unique appearance and friendly demeanor endearing them to dog owners globally.

Origin and Purpose of Bo-Dach

The parent breeds of the Bo-Dach, the Boston Terrier and the Dachshund, have histories spanning centuries, but the Bo-Dach is relatively recent, likely emerging during the 20th century when the trend for hybrid or designer dogs became popular.

The aim in breeding Bo-Dachs was to fuse the desirable characteristics of both parent breeds into one dog, resulting in a mixed breed with multiple purposes.

The Bo-Dach, or Boston-Weenie, combines physical and behavioral attributes from both parents to suit family life, such as a small body frame, specific coat color and patterns, a calm attitude, and a friendly nature.

With both Boston Terriers and Dachshunds known for their friendly and affectionate dispositions, the Bo-Dach was likely intended to provide a loyal and loving companion for individuals and families, their compact size making them suitable for apartment living.

As both parent breeds are small, the Bo-Dach also tends to be a small-sized hybrid, appealing to those who prefer smaller dogs or have limited living space. Physical characteristics like a longer frame, short stature, and longer legs similar to the Boston Terrier can be seen in this hybrid.

As adaptable breeds, the Boston Terrier and Dachshund’s traits are likely passed down to the Bo-Dach, making it a breed that adjusts well to various living environments and lifestyles.

Thus, the Bo-Dach, a blend of two venerable breeds, serves its purpose well, combining a host of desirable traits to make it a popular mixed breed dog.

Size and Appearance

The Boston Terrier Dachshund mixed breed represents a blend of the physical attributes of its parent breeds.

Its stature is compact and muscular, complemented by short height, a slightly elongated body, and longer, lean legs.

Let’s delve into these features in more detail:

Size

Generally falling into the small to medium-sized dog category, Bo-Dachs lean more towards the small end of the spectrum.

Their size is a direct reflection of their parentage, both Boston Terriers and Dachshunds being small breeds themselves.

A fully grown Bo-Dach typically stands between 10 to 15 inches tall and weighs up to 25 pounds, making them easy to handle, transport, and accommodate in smaller living spaces.

Boston Terrier Dachshund crossbreed. A fully grown Bo-Dach typically stands between 10 to 15 inches tall and weighs up to 25 pounds, making them easy to handle, transport, and accommodate in smaller living spaces.
Bo-Dach photo courtesy of @beaniethebodach on Instagram

General Appearance

Bo-Dachs display an interesting blend of their parents’ traits in their appearance. Their ears are typically droopy, perched atop a square muzzle, and their legs are long and lean, a feature borrowed from the Boston Terrier, differing from the short feet of the classic Dachshund.

Their tail is medium to long and pointed, and their large padded feet resemble those of the Dachshund rather than the Boston Terrier’s.

Head Shape and Facial Features

Boston Terrier Dachshund mixes boast a distinct head shape and unique facial features. Their head may be slightly rounded, reminiscent of the Boston Terrier, with a touch of elongation that harkens back to the hound-like face of a Dachshund.

Their facial expressions can vary, but you might see the expressive eyes characteristic of the Boston Terrier paired with the elongated muzzle typical of the Dachshund.

Body Shape

The body of a Bo-Dach is moderately elongated, yet compact and muscular, with a deep chest and a moderately short neck. The shape may lean more towards one parent breed or the other, depending on which traits are dominant.

Coat

Bo-Dachs can sport a variety of coat types. It may be short and smooth like the Boston Terrier’s, wirehaired like the Dachshund’s, or fall somewhere in between.

Coat color can also vary widely, with combinations of black, brown, brindle, white, or other shades commonly seen in both Boston Terriers and Dachshunds.

Personality and Temperament

The Boston-Weenie, makes for a lovable family pet, embodying an appealing mix of intelligence, energy, liveliness, and affection.

Their sociable and friendly nature, paired with their innate desire to stay close to their human companions, makes them an integral part of the family fabric.

Playful and energetic, Bo-Dachs thrive on interactive play and a variety of toys to stave off boredom. They are watchful and alert, exhibiting a protective demeanor inherited from the Boston Terrier.

Much like their Boston Terrier lineage, Bo-Dachs are affectionate and engaging around children and adults alike.

Despite being relatively straightforward to train, Bo-Dachs can sometimes display a streak of stubbornness, reminiscent of the Dachshund, and tenacity akin to the Boston Terrier. Dachshunds were actually named as one of the most stubborn dog breeds.

This combination can sometimes lead to training challenges. Left to their devices, they may bark loudly and begin to explore or wander, but with consistent training and socialization, these tendencies can be well-managed.

Boston Terrier mixed with Dachshund. Despite being relatively straightforward to train, Bo-Dachs can sometimes display a streak of stubbornness, reminiscent of the Dachshund, and tenacity akin to the Boston Terrier.
Bo-Dach photo courtesy of @jeanlucbarkard on Instagram

Bo-Dachs often form deep bonds with their human companions, which can occasionally lead to separation anxiety when left alone. They are fond of snuggling and staying close to their family members, reinforcing the strength of their attachment.

To better understand the personality and temperament of a Bo-Dach, let’s take a closer look at the parent breeds:

Dachshund

Renowned for their independence, Dachshunds may pass on this trait to their Bo-Dach offspring. Fearless and courageous by nature, Dachshunds are undeterred in the face of challenges, a characteristic often shared by the Bo-Dach.

Historically bred for hunting, Dachshunds possess strong instincts for digging, scent tracking, and chasing small prey, traits that can surface in the hybrid breed as well.

Boston Terrier

The sociable, friendly nature of Boston Terriers often manifests itself in Bo-Dachs, contributing to their overall likability.

Boston Terriers are known for their high energy levels, which Bo-Dachs may inherit, necessitating regular exercise and playtime.

Much like their Boston Terrier relatives, Bo-Dachs may also display alertness towards their environment, making for vigilant watchdogs.

Health and Lifespan

The health and lifespan of a Bo-Dach is influenced by multiple factors. Among these, genetic makeup is key, as breed-specific diseases and conditions from either parent may potentially be inherited by the Bo-Dach.

Simultaneously, the environment in which the dog lives and the nutrition it receives play crucial roles in preserving its health and promoting longevity.

On average, the Bo-Dach breed enjoys a lifespan ranging from 10 to 13 years. With consistent health check-ups, a balanced diet, and a hygienic living environment, this lifespan can potentially be extended, allowing the Bo-Dach to live a long, healthy life.

Despite these preventative measures, Bo-Dachs may still be susceptible to certain health conditions commonly found in their parent breeds.

Some of the most frequent health issues include:

Eye problems: Bo-Dachs may experience issues such as cataracts, corneal ulcers, and glaucoma. These eye conditions are relatively common in Boston Terriers due to their skull and face anatomy, characterized by bulging eyes.

Intervertebral Disc Disease: This is a prevalent condition in the Dachshund breed, whereby the vertebral disc supporting the spinal cord slips from its normal position. This can result in back pain and, in severe cases, paralysis if left untreated. This risk is not entirely mitigated when a Dachshund is bred with a Boston Terrier, meaning that Bo-Dachs are also prone to this condition.

Patellar Luxation: This condition is common in small breeds and occurs when the patella, or knee cap, slips out of place, usually to one side. If you notice your Bo-Dach lifting or stretching its foot while walking, it is advisable to consult a veterinarian.

In addition to these issues, conditions such as Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome, which is common in Boston Terriers due to their flat face and short muzzle, may also affect Bo-Dachs.

Other conditions to look out for include allergies, skin issues, dental diseases, and obesity.

Exercise Needs

As an energetic and lively breed, the Bo-Dach requires regular exercise to maintain its physical and mental wellbeing.

Incorporating a variety of physical activities, engaging play, and interactive training sessions are all essential components of a Bo-Dach’s exercise regimen.

Boston Terrier Dachshund mixed breed. As an energetic and lively breed, the Bo-Dach requires regular exercise to maintain its physical and mental wellbeing.
Bo-Dach photo courtesy of @luluandzaza on Instagram

Regular Walks: An essential form of exercise for the Bo-Dach is regular walks. Aim to take your Bo-Dach for one or two walks each day, lasting around 20 to 30 minutes each.

Not only does this offer essential physical activity and help burn off energy, but it also allows them to explore their environment, further stimulating their minds.

Interactive Play: Engage your Bo-Dach in interactive play sessions using toys, balls, or ropes. Games such as tug-of-war, fetch, or hide-and-seek with toys can provide both mental stimulation and physical engagement, making them excellent choices for playtime.

Toys: Providing puzzle or treat-dispensing toys encourages your Bo-Dach to use their problem-solving skills to access hidden treats or food. This form of mental engagement can keep them entertained and mentally active even during downtime.

Training: Bo-Dachs are well-suited to participate in agility training activities that match their size and physical abilities. You could set up simple obstacle courses in your backyard or enroll your Bo-Dach in organized agility classes.

Agility exercises can help improve their coordination, balance, and overall fitness, offering a fun and rewarding workout.

Scent-Based Games: With their keen sense of smell, engaging Bo-Dachs in nose work activities can be highly stimulating. Hide treats or toys around your home or use scent-based games where they have to search and find hidden objects. These activities tap into their natural instincts and offer mental stimulation.

Mental Stimulation: Alongside physical exercise, it’s equally important to provide mental stimulation through training sessions. Teach your Bo-Dach new tricks, practice obedience commands, and engage in interactive training exercises. Mental stimulation helps keep their minds sharp, satisfies their intelligence, and prevents boredom.

Grooming Needs

The grooming needs for a Boston Terrier Dachshund mix range from low to moderate depending on the specific traits they inherit from their parent breeds.

Coat Care: If your Bo-Dach inherits the short coat of a Boston Terrier, maintaining their coat’s shine can be achieved with occasional brushing. On the other hand, if they inherit the longer coat of a Dachshund, regular brushing will be necessary to keep their fur tidy and free of mats.

Bathing: Bathe your Bo-Dach only when necessary to avoid stripping the coat of its natural oils, which are essential for maintaining a healthy, glossy coat. Remember that these dogs are low-shedders with minimal dander production, which generally makes them less likely to trigger allergies in sensitive individuals.

Brushing: Ideally, your Bo-Dach should be brushed once or twice a week, regardless of their coat length. Regular brushing helps to distribute oils, remove loose hairs, and keep their coat looking its best.

Ear Care: Regular ear check-ups are essential to ensure that there’s no buildup of wax or dirt, and to check for any signs of ear mite infestations. Regular ear cleaning, as advised by your vet, can help prevent these issues.

Nail Trimming: Don’t let your Bo-Dach’s nails grow too long. Regular nail trimming is important for their comfort and overall foot health. Walking your dog on hard surfaces can help to naturally file down their nails, but you’ll still need to keep an eye on them and trim as necessary.

Dental Care: Brushing your Bo-Dach’s teeth once or twice a week with dog-friendly toothpaste can help to maintain their oral health. Regular dental cleaning is essential, as tartar buildup can lead to serious health issues in aging dogs. Regular dental check-ups and professional scaling, as advised by your vet, can help maintain their dental health.

Suitability as Family Pets

Just like their parent breeds, the Boston Terrier and Dachshund, Bo-Dachs make excellent family pets due to their friendly, calm, and affectionate nature. They’re known for being sociable, preferring to stay close to their human family, which makes them wonderful companions for people of all ages.

Bo-Dach dog looking out the window. Just like their parent breeds, the Boston Terrier and Dachshund, Bo-Dachs make excellent family pets due to their friendly, calm, and affectionate nature. They're known for being sociable, preferring to stay close to their human family, which makes them wonderful companions for people of all ages.
Bo-Dach photo courtesy of @maxthebodach on Instagram

Separation Anxiety: Due to their strong attachment to their family, Bo-Dachs may be prone to separation anxiety. It’s important to slowly acclimate them to periods of alone time to mitigate any distress when the family is away.

Living Spaces: Given their compact size, Bo-Dachs can adapt quite well to apartment living. However, they still need sufficient room to move and play. Make sure to provide them with a designated area for their bed or crate where they can rest and have some private space.

Kids and Other Pets: Bo-Dachs are known for being protective of children in the family and they make wonderful playmates, keeping kids engaged with their energetic nature. With proper socialization from an early age, Bo-Dachs can also get along well with other pets in the household.

Activity Level: Despite their ability to adapt to smaller living spaces, Bo-Dachs still require regular physical exercise and mental stimulation. Make sure to provide them with enough activities and interactive play to keep them from becoming bored or restless. This will help maintain their physical health and mental well-being.

Overall, the Bo-Dach is an excellent choice for a family pet. They’re loving, protective, and adaptable, making them suitable for families living in both apartments and houses.

Their social nature and love for play can provide endless hours of entertainment and companionship, making them a delightful addition to any home.

Is the Bo-Dach Right for You?

The Bo-Dach, a delightful hybrid of the Boston Terrier and Dachshund, combines the beneficial traits of both parent breeds in an appealing package.

The Bo-Dach stands out with its friendly personality, calm demeanor, and protective nature, which makes it an excellent family pet. They get along well with children and have moderate grooming and exercise requirements, making them a fit for various lifestyles.

While they can display a stubborn streak and may be prone to exploring due to their inherent prey drive, these behaviors can be managed with consistent training and socialization.

However, like any breed, Bo-Dachs are susceptible to certain health conditions inherited from their parent breeds. Notable among these are eye issues like cataracts, intervertebral disc disease, and patellar luxation.

With a balanced diet, a healthy lifestyle, and moderate exercise, the Bo-Dach can thrive and bring endless joy to their families. This lovable hybrid is a testament to the wonderful world of cross-breeding, and its appeal is a reflection of the best traits from its Boston Terrier and Dachshund parents.

Dr. Shahzaib Wahid DVM

Dr. Shahzaib Wahid, DVM, currently works an Associate Veterinarian at an animal clinic in Islamabad, Pakistan. As an experienced veterinarian, Dr. Wahid has a passion for providing advice and helping pet owners.

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